Save the skylark - keep your dog under control on the hills, say Conservators.

Malvern Gazette: (4230015) (4230015)

DOG owners are being urged to keep their pets on leads by Malvern Hills Conservators to protect the rare skylark.

The famous songbird is vulnerable during the nesting season from March to July, as it lays it eggs in small hollows in long grass, and can be easily disturbed or trampled by walkers and dogs.

The bird's numbers have declined across the country because of habitat loss, making Malvern's hills and commons an important nesting location

Beck Baker, the deputy conservation officer, said: "The sound of the skylark’s beautiful song once filled the spring air above the hills and commons, but now there are only a handful of birds nesting here. The Conservators will be working to raise awareness in the hope of encouraging more birds to breed here.

"This spring, the Conservators urge dog walkers to keep their pets under control at all times, keep to paths and if you see a disturbed or stressed bird, move away quickly to allow it to return to its nest.

"Even if your dog means no harm, the adult birds will see the dog as a threat and could abandon its nest. If the adults are away for too long, the eggs or chicks may get too cold and die."

The Conservators will be erecting signs to alert walkers, and are also reminding them not to let their dogs chase sheep, especially during the lambing season.

New signs on gates of the grazing areas highlight the importance of keeping your dog under control, and Conservators also advise owners to train their pets to ignore livestock anmd insure them against the costs of vet bills if they attack sheep.

The weekly Stockwatch in the Malvern Gazette's listings pages gives upi-to-date information about where stock is grazing.

Comments (6)

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6:34pm Thu 27 Feb 14

pudniw_gib says...

What about about being trampled by those cows up there?
What about about being trampled by those cows up there? pudniw_gib
  • Score: -1

11:25pm Thu 27 Feb 14

chrism says...

pudniw_gib wrote:
What about about being trampled by those cows up there?
Good point - keeping your dog on a lead should also stop it being trampled by the cows.
[quote][p][bold]pudniw_gib[/bold] wrote: What about about being trampled by those cows up there?[/p][/quote]Good point - keeping your dog on a lead should also stop it being trampled by the cows. chrism
  • Score: 1

6:18am Fri 28 Feb 14

New Kid on the Block says...

chrism wrote:
pudniw_gib wrote:
What about about being trampled by those cows up there?
Good point - keeping your dog on a lead should also stop it being trampled by the cows.
A dog on a lead is far more likely to be trampled by a cow. A loose dog can out run a cow, a dog on a lead can easily result in both dog and owner getting trampled. If you have been stupid enough to have a dog chased by a cow don't hang onto the lead.
A cow will regard a dog of any size as a wolf and may react accordingly. If you want to be safe don't take a dog into a field containing cows. They may normally be placid animals but they are large and powerful, if they feel that their young are under threat do you really think it is wise to be in the way of of over half a ton of protective mother?
[quote][p][bold]chrism[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]pudniw_gib[/bold] wrote: What about about being trampled by those cows up there?[/p][/quote]Good point - keeping your dog on a lead should also stop it being trampled by the cows.[/p][/quote]A dog on a lead is far more likely to be trampled by a cow. A loose dog can out run a cow, a dog on a lead can easily result in both dog and owner getting trampled. If you have been stupid enough to have a dog chased by a cow don't hang onto the lead. A cow will regard a dog of any size as a wolf and may react accordingly. If you want to be safe don't take a dog into a field containing cows. They may normally be placid animals but they are large and powerful, if they feel that their young are under threat do you really think it is wise to be in the way of of over half a ton of protective mother? New Kid on the Block
  • Score: 0

7:38am Fri 28 Feb 14

truth must out says...

New Kid on the Block wrote:
chrism wrote:
pudniw_gib wrote:
What about about being trampled by those cows up there?
Good point - keeping your dog on a lead should also stop it being trampled by the cows.
A dog on a lead is far more likely to be trampled by a cow. A loose dog can out run a cow, a dog on a lead can easily result in both dog and owner getting trampled. If you have been stupid enough to have a dog chased by a cow don't hang onto the lead.
A cow will regard a dog of any size as a wolf and may react accordingly. If you want to be safe don't take a dog into a field containing cows. They may normally be placid animals but they are large and powerful, if they feel that their young are under threat do you really think it is wise to be in the way of of over half a ton of protective mother?
Only go there with big dogs...in the event of cows threatening to trample you sit on the dog and ride quickly to safety.
[quote][p][bold]New Kid on the Block[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]chrism[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]pudniw_gib[/bold] wrote: What about about being trampled by those cows up there?[/p][/quote]Good point - keeping your dog on a lead should also stop it being trampled by the cows.[/p][/quote]A dog on a lead is far more likely to be trampled by a cow. A loose dog can out run a cow, a dog on a lead can easily result in both dog and owner getting trampled. If you have been stupid enough to have a dog chased by a cow don't hang onto the lead. A cow will regard a dog of any size as a wolf and may react accordingly. If you want to be safe don't take a dog into a field containing cows. They may normally be placid animals but they are large and powerful, if they feel that their young are under threat do you really think it is wise to be in the way of of over half a ton of protective mother?[/p][/quote]Only go there with big dogs...in the event of cows threatening to trample you sit on the dog and ride quickly to safety. truth must out
  • Score: 1

7:57am Fri 28 Feb 14

mudmad says...

Of course, there's not a problem presented by the mountain bikers who go off the paths and cycle down hills at break neck speed...maybe they should be banned from the hills during those months when the skylarks need protection - then we innocent walkers can return to a little peace and sanctuary during our walks?
Of course, there's not a problem presented by the mountain bikers who go off the paths and cycle down hills at break neck speed...maybe they should be banned from the hills during those months when the skylarks need protection - then we innocent walkers can return to a little peace and sanctuary during our walks? mudmad
  • Score: 0

8:16am Fri 28 Feb 14

js says...

It's not just the hills, Upton Ham has the same problem of dogs off leads frightening several ground nesting birds.
It's not just the hills, Upton Ham has the same problem of dogs off leads frightening several ground nesting birds. js
  • Score: 0

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