Stop your dog chasing sheep on the Malvern Hills

Malvern Gazette: Credit: Alison Spiers Photography.Your dog can learn to control itself around livestock. Credit: Alison Spiers Photography.Your dog can learn to control itself around livestock.

ARE you worried about walking your dog on the Malvern Hills alongside the sheep and cattle?

Do you want to learn how to stop your dog from chasing livestock, children, joggers or cyclists?

If so, Malvern Hills Conservators have the answer for you.

Staring next Sunday, June 13, the guardians of the hills have organised a training course featuring qualified dog trainer and behaviourist Sue Harper.

The course focuses on controlling dogs around livestock and other moving targets. Following indoor sessions, the training continues outdoors where you and your dog will come face-to-face with friendly sheep in a controlled environment.

Sessions are held every Sunday for six weeks from 4pm to 6pm at a location near Colwall, and owners who attend each session will only have to pay £30, with the Conservators subsidising the cost.

To book a place, contact 01684 568067.

Comments (12)

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1:45pm Wed 2 Jul 14

Tobster says...

If someone's dog is completely out of control around sheep they should be put down. The owner, that is.
If someone's dog is completely out of control around sheep they should be put down. The owner, that is. Tobster
  • Score: 7

9:37pm Wed 2 Jul 14

BadgerMash says...

There really is no excuse for having an out of control dog anywhere. However, having a dog off the lead, whether under control or not, on most of the popular parts of the Malverns is inadvisable due to dangerous cycling (both legal and not). In fact, I would strongly advise anyone with a dog, small children, or who is not agile to avoid all the most popular paths on the Hills, including those on which cycling is illegal, unless the Malvern Hills Conservators, Police or County Council decide to enforce the law - which is very unlikely.
There really is no excuse for having an out of control dog anywhere. However, having a dog off the lead, whether under control or not, on most of the popular parts of the Malverns is inadvisable due to dangerous cycling (both legal and not). In fact, I would strongly advise anyone with a dog, small children, or who is not agile to avoid all the most popular paths on the Hills, including those on which cycling is illegal, unless the Malvern Hills Conservators, Police or County Council decide to enforce the law - which is very unlikely. BadgerMash
  • Score: -2

1:06am Thu 3 Jul 14

chrism says...

Personally I'd advise not cycling, walking or running on any of the paths on the hills, legal or not, having been bitten by dogs whilst participating (quite legally and safely) in all 3 activities. I wonder how the number of people bitten by dogs compares to the real number of people hit by out of control bikers?
Personally I'd advise not cycling, walking or running on any of the paths on the hills, legal or not, having been bitten by dogs whilst participating (quite legally and safely) in all 3 activities. I wonder how the number of people bitten by dogs compares to the real number of people hit by out of control bikers? chrism
  • Score: 1

8:56am Thu 3 Jul 14

BadgerMash says...

chrism wrote:
Personally I'd advise not cycling, walking or running on any of the paths on the hills, legal or not, having been bitten by dogs whilst participating (quite legally and safely) in all 3 activities. I wonder how the number of people bitten by dogs compares to the real number of people hit by out of control bikers?
In the last seven years of walking on the Malverns I have been hit by cyclists twice, had to take evasive action resulting in injury to myself three times, been subjected to abusive threats of violence from cyclists twice, had a cycle deliberately ridden at speed at me on a narrow path once, seen a dog hit by a cyclist once, seen the incredibly narrow escape of two toddlers from three very fast down hill cyclists, saw what I thought would be a fatality of a teenage cyclist who went over his handlebars avoiding walkers when he was riding too fast on a bridlepath, and been threatened and had to step off paths to avoid cyclists at least once a week, every week. I know two residents who no longer walk on the Hills for fear of cyclists and I know another who was assaulted by a cyclist for pointing out that they were on a "no cycling path". In that time I've not been injured by a dog or seen anyone else injured, though I have had badly trained dogs jump up at me perhaps four or five times and a friend has had problems with stray dogs attacking sheep. You want to compare the numbers? You can count my scars if you like: Cyclists 2, Dogs Nil.
[quote][p][bold]chrism[/bold] wrote: Personally I'd advise not cycling, walking or running on any of the paths on the hills, legal or not, having been bitten by dogs whilst participating (quite legally and safely) in all 3 activities. I wonder how the number of people bitten by dogs compares to the real number of people hit by out of control bikers?[/p][/quote]In the last seven years of walking on the Malverns I have been hit by cyclists twice, had to take evasive action resulting in injury to myself three times, been subjected to abusive threats of violence from cyclists twice, had a cycle deliberately ridden at speed at me on a narrow path once, seen a dog hit by a cyclist once, seen the incredibly narrow escape of two toddlers from three very fast down hill cyclists, saw what I thought would be a fatality of a teenage cyclist who went over his handlebars avoiding walkers when he was riding too fast on a bridlepath, and been threatened and had to step off paths to avoid cyclists at least once a week, every week. I know two residents who no longer walk on the Hills for fear of cyclists and I know another who was assaulted by a cyclist for pointing out that they were on a "no cycling path". In that time I've not been injured by a dog or seen anyone else injured, though I have had badly trained dogs jump up at me perhaps four or five times and a friend has had problems with stray dogs attacking sheep. You want to compare the numbers? You can count my scars if you like: Cyclists 2, Dogs Nil. BadgerMash
  • Score: 2

11:19am Thu 3 Jul 14

Andy-Apache says...

"At least once a week, every week"

Not again... What do you have against cyclists sir? I have said before, I walk on the hills pretty regularly and have STILL to be hit by, or abused by a cyclist! I have however been shouted a friendly "scuse me" several times, and am happy to step aside while they pass. I have witnessed obviously anti-cycling walkers who refuse to budge from the middle of a track, forcing cyclists to stop and walk behind said walker until there's space to pass. Similar mentality to those rather pathetic drivers you see move out to the white line preventing bikers passing in slow traffic.

Without wishing to upset that easiest of groups to upset, the Ramblers Association, you aren't a member are you? You seem to share their opinion that the countryside is for them and no-one else. In the past, I have had my 4x4 hit with a walking stick by a rambler erroneously believing I was on an illegal trail, I've been shouted at by them for riding a bike on a trail, until I pointed out that the trail was on private land owned by a friends father and they were in fact trespassing, and I know motorcyclists and horse riders who've all been threatened by bile spitting members of this self serving bunch.

Please remember that the Malvern Hills are rightly enjoyed by all walks of society, and NOT for the exclusive use of walkers. Most of the more popular trails are legal for cycling and horse riding (take a look at an OS map), and dogs should be under control (everywhere, not just on the hills). Accept those facts and stop moaning.
"At least once a week, every week" Not again... What do you have against cyclists sir? I have said before, I walk on the hills pretty regularly and have STILL to be hit by, or abused by a cyclist! I have however been shouted a friendly "scuse me" several times, and am happy to step aside while they pass. I have witnessed obviously anti-cycling walkers who refuse to budge from the middle of a track, forcing cyclists to stop and walk behind said walker until there's space to pass. Similar mentality to those rather pathetic drivers you see move out to the white line preventing bikers passing in slow traffic. Without wishing to upset that easiest of groups to upset, the Ramblers Association, you aren't a member are you? You seem to share their opinion that the countryside is for them and no-one else. In the past, I have had my 4x4 hit with a walking stick by a rambler erroneously believing I was on an illegal trail, I've been shouted at by them for riding a bike on a trail, until I pointed out that the trail was on private land owned by a friends father and they were in fact trespassing, and I know motorcyclists and horse riders who've all been threatened by bile spitting members of this self serving bunch. Please remember that the Malvern Hills are rightly enjoyed by all walks of society, and NOT for the exclusive use of walkers. Most of the more popular trails are legal for cycling and horse riding (take a look at an OS map), and dogs should be under control (everywhere, not just on the hills). Accept those facts and stop moaning. Andy-Apache
  • Score: 2

7:14pm Thu 3 Jul 14

BadgerMash says...

Andy-Apache wrote:
"At least once a week, every week"

Not again... What do you have against cyclists sir? I have said before, I walk on the hills pretty regularly and have STILL to be hit by, or abused by a cyclist! I have however been shouted a friendly "scuse me" several times, and am happy to step aside while they pass. I have witnessed obviously anti-cycling walkers who refuse to budge from the middle of a track, forcing cyclists to stop and walk behind said walker until there's space to pass. Similar mentality to those rather pathetic drivers you see move out to the white line preventing bikers passing in slow traffic.

Without wishing to upset that easiest of groups to upset, the Ramblers Association, you aren't a member are you? You seem to share their opinion that the countryside is for them and no-one else. In the past, I have had my 4x4 hit with a walking stick by a rambler erroneously believing I was on an illegal trail, I've been shouted at by them for riding a bike on a trail, until I pointed out that the trail was on private land owned by a friends father and they were in fact trespassing, and I know motorcyclists and horse riders who've all been threatened by bile spitting members of this self serving bunch.

Please remember that the Malvern Hills are rightly enjoyed by all walks of society, and NOT for the exclusive use of walkers. Most of the more popular trails are legal for cycling and horse riding (take a look at an OS map), and dogs should be under control (everywhere, not just on the hills). Accept those facts and stop moaning.
So, we have to wait for a fatality?
[quote][p][bold]Andy-Apache[/bold] wrote: "At least once a week, every week" Not again... What do you have against cyclists sir? I have said before, I walk on the hills pretty regularly and have STILL to be hit by, or abused by a cyclist! I have however been shouted a friendly "scuse me" several times, and am happy to step aside while they pass. I have witnessed obviously anti-cycling walkers who refuse to budge from the middle of a track, forcing cyclists to stop and walk behind said walker until there's space to pass. Similar mentality to those rather pathetic drivers you see move out to the white line preventing bikers passing in slow traffic. Without wishing to upset that easiest of groups to upset, the Ramblers Association, you aren't a member are you? You seem to share their opinion that the countryside is for them and no-one else. In the past, I have had my 4x4 hit with a walking stick by a rambler erroneously believing I was on an illegal trail, I've been shouted at by them for riding a bike on a trail, until I pointed out that the trail was on private land owned by a friends father and they were in fact trespassing, and I know motorcyclists and horse riders who've all been threatened by bile spitting members of this self serving bunch. Please remember that the Malvern Hills are rightly enjoyed by all walks of society, and NOT for the exclusive use of walkers. Most of the more popular trails are legal for cycling and horse riding (take a look at an OS map), and dogs should be under control (everywhere, not just on the hills). Accept those facts and stop moaning.[/p][/quote]So, we have to wait for a fatality? BadgerMash
  • Score: 1

1:05am Fri 4 Jul 14

chrism says...

Given BadgerMash's claimed experience is so different to that of most people on the hills, it appears there are 3 possibilities:
1) he's making it all up
2) there's some other set of Malvern Hills somewhere
3) he's causing most of the aggro by being threatening and obstructive to perfectly law abiding and innocent cyclists.

Given I've spent a lot of time on the hills in various ways and I've never experienced any of the negative behaviour from cyclists he mentions (neither from a member of any groups I've ridden with, who are invariably careful around walkers, nor when I've met cyclists whilst on foot), yet I have experienced aggression from walkers whilst I was riding perfectly legally and slowly and giving way to them I suspect it's a combination of 1 and 3. Oh and as mentioned above I've also experienced plenty of out of control dogs, including those who's owners complained at me when I was perfectly in control and managed to avoid their mutt when it ran out in front of me.

Fortunately most walkers on the hills are also perfectly decent and sensible people - mostly they seem to cheer you on when you're on a climb.
Given BadgerMash's claimed experience is so different to that of most people on the hills, it appears there are 3 possibilities: 1) he's making it all up 2) there's some other set of Malvern Hills somewhere 3) he's causing most of the aggro by being threatening and obstructive to perfectly law abiding and innocent cyclists. Given I've spent a lot of time on the hills in various ways and I've never experienced any of the negative behaviour from cyclists he mentions (neither from a member of any groups I've ridden with, who are invariably careful around walkers, nor when I've met cyclists whilst on foot), yet I have experienced aggression from walkers whilst I was riding perfectly legally and slowly and giving way to them I suspect it's a combination of 1 and 3. Oh and as mentioned above I've also experienced plenty of out of control dogs, including those who's owners complained at me when I was perfectly in control and managed to avoid their mutt when it ran out in front of me. Fortunately most walkers on the hills are also perfectly decent and sensible people - mostly they seem to cheer you on when you're on a climb. chrism
  • Score: -1

1:07am Fri 4 Jul 14

GeeRDee says...

Well said, Andy-Apache.
The article is about irresponsible Dog Owners - the comment section appears to be a poor attempt at distraction on to the matter of good manners on our shared hills.
The small minority who let their pooches roam (and defecate) freely while knowing they will rarely respond when summoned continues to frustrate many hill users. I accept that there are many well behaved and well trained dogs on the hills which often impress me.

Put the dog on a lead unless you trust the dog implicitly, bag and bin the poop (do not leave it on benches, in trees and on the paths). The paths leading from the car parks tend to smell like toilets - not the best welcome to any visitor.
Well said, Andy-Apache. The article is about irresponsible Dog Owners - the comment section appears to be a poor attempt at distraction on to the matter of good manners on our shared hills. The small minority who let their pooches roam (and defecate) freely while knowing they will rarely respond when summoned continues to frustrate many hill users. I accept that there are many well behaved and well trained dogs on the hills which often impress me. Put the dog on a lead unless you trust the dog implicitly, bag and bin the poop (do not leave it on benches, in trees and on the paths). The paths leading from the car parks tend to smell like toilets - not the best welcome to any visitor. GeeRDee
  • Score: -1

8:10am Fri 4 Jul 14

Andy-Apache says...

Badger Mash, I quote "had to step off paths to avoid cyclists"

And this is a problem because?

Remember, most of the popular paths *are* bridal ways, so you legally have to share them with cyclists and horses. If a cyclist comes along, why do you feel it inconveniences you to step aside for a few seconds? Surely you're not in a hurry?

Honestly, if people just got along, and appreciate that everyone wants to enjoy the hills, be it on foot, horseback, bicycle, paraglider, radio controlled aircraft flyer etc, it would be a nicer place.

Myself, I like to chuckle at a purple faced cyclist climbing up the beacon (and they generally give me an out of breath nod) and feel slightly jealous of those on brightly coloured 'chutes hanging silently a few hundred feet above the slopes, and sit and watch aerobatics performed by the radio controlled planes (must get up there with mine one of these days) and pass the time of day with other walkers, be they with dog or not.

You'll find that the selfish ones with bouncing out of control dogs, or the legendary lethal cyclist are antisocial whether they're on the hills or not. That's life!

PS - Can't wait for the Tour of Britain coming through Malvern!
Badger Mash, I quote "had to step off paths to avoid cyclists" And this is a problem because? Remember, most of the popular paths *are* bridal ways, so you legally have to share them with cyclists and horses. If a cyclist comes along, why do you feel it inconveniences you to step aside for a few seconds? Surely you're not in a hurry? Honestly, if people just got along, and appreciate that everyone wants to enjoy the hills, be it on foot, horseback, bicycle, paraglider, radio controlled aircraft flyer etc, it would be a nicer place. Myself, I like to chuckle at a purple faced cyclist climbing up the beacon (and they generally give me an out of breath nod) and feel slightly jealous of those on brightly coloured 'chutes hanging silently a few hundred feet above the slopes, and sit and watch aerobatics performed by the radio controlled planes (must get up there with mine one of these days) and pass the time of day with other walkers, be they with dog or not. You'll find that the selfish ones with bouncing out of control dogs, or the legendary lethal cyclist are antisocial whether they're on the hills or not. That's life! PS - Can't wait for the Tour of Britain coming through Malvern! Andy-Apache
  • Score: 0

8:26am Fri 4 Jul 14

BadgerMash says...

I entirely agree with sentiments expressed here about irresponsible dog owners and poorly trained dogs. I also agree with comments concerning some members of the Ramblers Association (though in the distant past this organisation did some wonderful work) and have had remarkably similar experiences with some them to "Andy-Apache". However, I regularly see and experience the serious hazards caused by irresponsible or unaware cyclists on the Hills - and the very much increased risk caused by the presence of dogs in the same space. I am also aware there are responsible cyclists and dog owners who use the Hills.

The Hills can be successfully shared by a variety of users - I regularly meet horse-riders on the Hills and have always found them responsible, considerate and aware of potential risks. Hang glider users, who, in the nature of what they do, take up substantial areas close to the ridge, are always very careful not to cause inconvenience and are model users of the Hills.

Whatever personal remarks may be made about those of us who continue to draw attention to this matter, the problem is not going away. I am certainly not looking for cyclists to be banned from the entirety of Hills - though I am aware of local people who actively lobby the Conservators for this.

I would love to enjoy sharing the Hills with cyclists - but cant enjoy the experience if being injured or (whether intentionally or not) threatened.
I entirely agree with sentiments expressed here about irresponsible dog owners and poorly trained dogs. I also agree with comments concerning some members of the Ramblers Association (though in the distant past this organisation did some wonderful work) and have had remarkably similar experiences with some them to "Andy-Apache". However, I regularly see and experience the serious hazards caused by irresponsible or unaware cyclists on the Hills - and the very much increased risk caused by the presence of dogs in the same space. I am also aware there are responsible cyclists and dog owners who use the Hills. The Hills can be successfully shared by a variety of users - I regularly meet horse-riders on the Hills and have always found them responsible, considerate and aware of potential risks. Hang glider users, who, in the nature of what they do, take up substantial areas close to the ridge, are always very careful not to cause inconvenience and are model users of the Hills. Whatever personal remarks may be made about those of us who continue to draw attention to this matter, the problem is not going away. I am certainly not looking for cyclists to be banned from the entirety of Hills - though I am aware of local people who actively lobby the Conservators for this. I would love to enjoy sharing the Hills with cyclists - but cant enjoy the experience if being injured or (whether intentionally or not) threatened. BadgerMash
  • Score: 4

8:33am Fri 4 Jul 14

BadgerMash says...

'Andy-Apache' "Badger Mash, I quote "had to step off paths to avoid cyclists"

And this is a problem because?"

Because where there is a steeply ascending slope on one side of the path and an equally steep drop on the other (for example the Jubilee Drive path), or gorse, brambles trees Etc., and seconds to get out of the way of speeding downhill riders, this is a problem - all the more so for anyone with a dog on or off a lead, small children, or those who are not particularly agile.
'Andy-Apache' "Badger Mash, I quote "had to step off paths to avoid cyclists" And this is a problem because?" Because where there is a steeply ascending slope on one side of the path and an equally steep drop on the other (for example the Jubilee Drive path), or gorse, brambles trees Etc., and seconds to get out of the way of speeding downhill riders, this is a problem - all the more so for anyone with a dog on or off a lead, small children, or those who are not particularly agile. BadgerMash
  • Score: 4

1:17pm Thu 10 Jul 14

billybobuk says...

This is an advert not a story! Lazy journalism
This is an advert not a story! Lazy journalism billybobuk
  • Score: -2

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