Life-size figures to appear in the Hive for exhibition

Ed Elliott's exhibition in the Hive.

Ed Elliott's exhibition in the Hive.

First published in News

A PLACE of learning and contemplation will be transformed by life-size wooden sculptures.

Sculptor Ed Elliott, aged 28, explores presence in sculptural objects, often using the human figure, and will be displaying a collection of four pieces of work at the Hive in Worcester until Friday, July 18.

The Hive Arts Steering Group selected the work of the former Chase School, Malvern, pupil, who has a workshop at Trumpet Corner, near Ledbury, to showcase work by local artists to the public.

Mr Elliott said: “An exhibition at the Hive is such a great opportunity to show my work to the people of Worcestershire. I’m really looking forward to finally exhibiting in the city where I was born.”

A spokesman for the steering group said: "We are really keen to support the work of new and emerging artists, especially when their work shows a clear connection to the building.

"We felt that Ed's sculptures were a good fit, reflecting the sustainable materials used in the Hive."

The ground floor of the Hive will host a collection of the emerging artists’ recent sculptures, drawings as well as photographs of work in-situ.

Comments (6)

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12:19pm Thu 12 Jun 14

CJH says...

"A place of learning and contemplation" ? Yes, if you can hear yourself think for all the unwanted noise...
"A place of learning and contemplation" ? Yes, if you can hear yourself think for all the unwanted noise... CJH
  • Score: 1

12:48pm Thu 12 Jun 14

Tony Pingree says...

Why are so many people against the Hive and the people that use it?

I've been there many times and it's pretty good. (I'm in my fifties)

I often get the impression that some of the people who complain still believe children should be seen and not heard and beaten twice daily just because they are young.
Why are so many people against the Hive and the people that use it? I've been there many times and it's pretty good. (I'm in my fifties) I often get the impression that some of the people who complain still believe children should be seen and not heard and beaten twice daily just because they are young. Tony Pingree
  • Score: 0

1:21pm Thu 12 Jun 14

CJH says...

Tony Pingree wrote:
Why are so many people against the Hive and the people that use it?

I've been there many times and it's pretty good. (I'm in my fifties)

I often get the impression that some of the people who complain still believe children should be seen and not heard and beaten twice daily just because they are young.
I am absolutely not against the Hive, and have supported it from the very beginning despite all the criticism. My problem, and that of many others, is that if you want to study or do research the noise is just too much. There are no doors on the children's section which means that the noise just goes round the building. Plus the uncontrolled 'yoof' who use it as a social club, with all the associated problems. It's only a very small minority, but it's enough to make a trip there unpleasant. Of course children should be encouraged to use libraries, but they must also respect other users. It's pity the library staff are unable to do anything about it. They dislike it as much as we do.
[quote][p][bold]Tony Pingree[/bold] wrote: Why are so many people against the Hive and the people that use it? I've been there many times and it's pretty good. (I'm in my fifties) I often get the impression that some of the people who complain still believe children should be seen and not heard and beaten twice daily just because they are young.[/p][/quote]I am absolutely not against the Hive, and have supported it from the very beginning despite all the criticism. My problem, and that of many others, is that if you want to study or do research the noise is just too much. There are no doors on the children's section which means that the noise just goes round the building. Plus the uncontrolled 'yoof' who use it as a social club, with all the associated problems. It's only a very small minority, but it's enough to make a trip there unpleasant. Of course children should be encouraged to use libraries, but they must also respect other users. It's pity the library staff are unable to do anything about it. They dislike it as much as we do. CJH
  • Score: 2

1:58pm Thu 12 Jun 14

Tony Pingree says...

Hi CJH,

From what I can make out, the Hive was designed to attract as many different members as it could from our rich and varied society.

Being a library is just one of its functions the Hive has to offer.

Children are encouraged to use the lower levels of the building and by inherent design... children can sometimes be a little noisy.

I must agree with you that users should respect other users but remember respect runs both ways.

You could try using the upper levels of the building. That way respect could be achieved for both parties. They wouldn't annoy you with the noise and you wouldn't annoy them by moaning about it.

One other thought has crossed my mind. Maybe you're wrong.

There now seems to be an awful lot of people who manage to study for higher education in the Hive. (noise or not)
Hi CJH, From what I can make out, the Hive was designed to attract as many different members as it could from our rich and varied society. Being a library is just one of its functions the Hive has to offer. Children are encouraged to use the lower levels of the building and by inherent design... children can sometimes be a little noisy. I must agree with you that users should respect other users but remember respect runs both ways. You could try using the upper levels of the building. That way respect could be achieved for both parties. They wouldn't annoy you with the noise and you wouldn't annoy them by moaning about it. One other thought has crossed my mind. Maybe you're wrong. There now seems to be an awful lot of people who manage to study for higher education in the Hive. (noise or not) Tony Pingree
  • Score: -1

2:07pm Thu 12 Jun 14

CJH says...

Tony Pingree wrote:
Hi CJH,

From what I can make out, the Hive was designed to attract as many different members as it could from our rich and varied society.

Being a library is just one of its functions the Hive has to offer.

Children are encouraged to use the lower levels of the building and by inherent design... children can sometimes be a little noisy.

I must agree with you that users should respect other users but remember respect runs both ways.

You could try using the upper levels of the building. That way respect could be achieved for both parties. They wouldn't annoy you with the noise and you wouldn't annoy them by moaning about it.

One other thought has crossed my mind. Maybe you're wrong.

There now seems to be an awful lot of people who manage to study for higher education in the Hive. (noise or not)
I am using the upper levels! That's where the archives are, and even the staff have problems with the noise there, and admit is was badly designed internally. Looks great but not practical. Many students have also complained about the lack of quiet areas for study. A simple solution would be to put doors on the children's area. It's not rocket science. The kids could make as much noise as they want, and we would get a bit more peace and quiet. Win-win, and respect all round!
[quote][p][bold]Tony Pingree[/bold] wrote: Hi CJH, From what I can make out, the Hive was designed to attract as many different members as it could from our rich and varied society. Being a library is just one of its functions the Hive has to offer. Children are encouraged to use the lower levels of the building and by inherent design... children can sometimes be a little noisy. I must agree with you that users should respect other users but remember respect runs both ways. You could try using the upper levels of the building. That way respect could be achieved for both parties. They wouldn't annoy you with the noise and you wouldn't annoy them by moaning about it. One other thought has crossed my mind. Maybe you're wrong. There now seems to be an awful lot of people who manage to study for higher education in the Hive. (noise or not)[/p][/quote]I am using the upper levels! That's where the archives are, and even the staff have problems with the noise there, and admit is was badly designed internally. Looks great but not practical. Many students have also complained about the lack of quiet areas for study. A simple solution would be to put doors on the children's area. It's not rocket science. The kids could make as much noise as they want, and we would get a bit more peace and quiet. Win-win, and respect all round! CJH
  • Score: 1

2:33pm Thu 12 Jun 14

CJH says...

Tony Pingree wrote:
Hi CJH,

From what I can make out, the Hive was designed to attract as many different members as it could from our rich and varied society.

Being a library is just one of its functions the Hive has to offer.

Children are encouraged to use the lower levels of the building and by inherent design... children can sometimes be a little noisy.

I must agree with you that users should respect other users but remember respect runs both ways.

You could try using the upper levels of the building. That way respect could be achieved for both parties. They wouldn't annoy you with the noise and you wouldn't annoy them by moaning about it.

One other thought has crossed my mind. Maybe you're wrong.

There now seems to be an awful lot of people who manage to study for higher education in the Hive. (noise or not)
And furthermore - the noise goes UP through the central area - the building is like a giant funnel for sound! So going higher doesn't mean you get away from it! And, yes it does annoy me, but no, I have never spoken to any child about the noise. That is what the staff are there for, and I really resent your assumption that I'm moaning and annoying these children! That would be totally inappropriate behaviour. And, 'maybe I'm wrong'? No, I'm not. And neither are all the others who have a problem with it.
[quote][p][bold]Tony Pingree[/bold] wrote: Hi CJH, From what I can make out, the Hive was designed to attract as many different members as it could from our rich and varied society. Being a library is just one of its functions the Hive has to offer. Children are encouraged to use the lower levels of the building and by inherent design... children can sometimes be a little noisy. I must agree with you that users should respect other users but remember respect runs both ways. You could try using the upper levels of the building. That way respect could be achieved for both parties. They wouldn't annoy you with the noise and you wouldn't annoy them by moaning about it. One other thought has crossed my mind. Maybe you're wrong. There now seems to be an awful lot of people who manage to study for higher education in the Hive. (noise or not)[/p][/quote]And furthermore - the noise goes UP through the central area - the building is like a giant funnel for sound! So going higher doesn't mean you get away from it! And, yes it does annoy me, but no, I have never spoken to any child about the noise. That is what the staff are there for, and I really resent your assumption that I'm moaning and annoying these children! That would be totally inappropriate behaviour. And, 'maybe I'm wrong'? No, I'm not. And neither are all the others who have a problem with it. CJH
  • Score: 2

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