New cleaning machines to cut down hospital infections

Malvern Gazette: Worcestershire Royal Hospital Worcestershire Royal Hospital

HOSPITAL bosses in Worcestershire are working to cut down infection rates with a set of new cleaning machines.

Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust – the organisation which runs Worcestershire Royal Hospital, Kidderminster Hospital and Redditch’s Alexandra Hospital – has agreed to lease five hydrogen peroxide machines for use at the three sites.

Hydrogen peroxide vapour is used to eradicate microorganisms common in hospitals such as MRSA, norovirus and e-coli.

It was first used in Singapore during the SARS outbreak in 2002 and was later stocked by the American government to combat the threat of an anthrax attack.

The vapour is spread around exposed surfaces and studies have shown it can cut down the rate of infection by up to 64 per cent.

Throughout the winter a number of wards at hospitals in the county were frequently closed to visitors as a result of outbreaks of norovirus.

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4:00pm Wed 28 May 14

Allan Whitehead says...

Here we go again the NHS spending monies on hiring cleaning machines. Without any cost mentioned. How many cleaners will these machines replace? We employed cleaners with Mops and buckets who worked very hard making sure their mops went into every nook and cranny. A few drops of disinfectant (San Izal disinfectant or Jeys Fluid) these two will remove all germs inside and outside Hospitals. If the Hospital is not clean outside then the hospital is only half-clean.
People used hydrogen peroxide to clean their teeth and bleach their hair.

How much hydrogen peroxide will these machine use, and at what cost per litre. We should use tried and tested methods, mops buckets with a few drops of San Izal disinfectant for inside, and Jeys Fluid for outside.
Here we go again the NHS spending monies on hiring cleaning machines. Without any cost mentioned. How many cleaners will these machines replace? We employed cleaners with Mops and buckets who worked very hard making sure their mops went into every nook and cranny. A few drops of disinfectant (San Izal disinfectant or Jeys Fluid) these two will remove all germs inside and outside Hospitals. If the Hospital is not clean outside then the hospital is only half-clean. People used hydrogen peroxide to clean their teeth and bleach their hair. How much hydrogen peroxide will these machine use, and at what cost per litre. We should use tried and tested methods, mops buckets with a few drops of San Izal disinfectant for inside, and Jeys Fluid for outside. Allan Whitehead
  • Score: 1

2:59pm Sat 31 May 14

PFI Compliance says...

Hydrogen Peroxide is a gimmick being peddled by manufacturers of these machines which they will happily sell or rent to the NHS.

Attention should be focussed at why the Private Sector cleaning contracts are not performing and keeping germs down to a reasonable level in line with the PFI output specification.

The soft services sub contractor should be cleaning the inside of the hospital using the agreed specified chemicals; in line with a contractual a frequency that is regularly audited by either the PFI company (Catalyst). the NHS Trust or a 3rd party advising the Trust. This is also the case for cleaning gutters, cladding, footpaths, drains, bus shelters, glass etc.

NHS Trust generally believe what they are told in monthly reports and that the PFI contractor 100% delivers the contracted services. This is all too often not the case.

There are mechanisms to award service failure points, or to recover Availability payments. In the worst cases if the failure of a service (which is the responsibility of the PFI to deliver) leads to serious patient harm or death then this can be grounds for a material breach of contract which may if upheld allow termination of the PFI contract.

The hospital construct cost inclusive was circa £95M but the taxpayer/NHS will pay back in excess of £850M.............N
o wonder the country nearly went bust.
Hydrogen Peroxide is a gimmick being peddled by manufacturers of these machines which they will happily sell or rent to the NHS. Attention should be focussed at why the Private Sector cleaning contracts are not performing and keeping germs down to a reasonable level in line with the PFI output specification. The soft services sub contractor should be cleaning the inside of the hospital using the agreed specified chemicals; in line with a contractual a frequency that is regularly audited by either the PFI company (Catalyst). the NHS Trust or a 3rd party advising the Trust. This is also the case for cleaning gutters, cladding, footpaths, drains, bus shelters, glass etc. NHS Trust generally believe what they are told in monthly reports and that the PFI contractor 100% delivers the contracted services. This is all too often not the case. There are mechanisms to award service failure points, or to recover Availability payments. In the worst cases if the failure of a service (which is the responsibility of the PFI to deliver) leads to serious patient harm or death then this can be grounds for a material breach of contract which may if upheld allow termination of the PFI contract. The hospital construct cost inclusive was circa £95M but the taxpayer/NHS will pay back in excess of £850M.............N o wonder the country nearly went bust. PFI Compliance
  • Score: 0

4:59pm Sat 31 May 14

Allan Whitehead says...

PFI Compliance wrote:
Hydrogen Peroxide is a gimmick being peddled by manufacturers of these machines which they will happily sell or rent to the NHS.

Attention should be focussed at why the Private Sector cleaning contracts are not performing and keeping germs down to a reasonable level in line with the PFI output specification.

The soft services sub contractor should be cleaning the inside of the hospital using the agreed specified chemicals; in line with a contractual a frequency that is regularly audited by either the PFI company (Catalyst). the NHS Trust or a 3rd party advising the Trust. This is also the case for cleaning gutters, cladding, footpaths, drains, bus shelters, glass etc.

NHS Trust generally believe what they are told in monthly reports and that the PFI contractor 100% delivers the contracted services. This is all too often not the case.

There are mechanisms to award service failure points, or to recover Availability payments. In the worst cases if the failure of a service (which is the responsibility of the PFI to deliver) leads to serious patient harm or death then this can be grounds for a material breach of contract which may if upheld allow termination of the PFI contract.

The hospital construct cost inclusive was circa £95M but the taxpayer/NHS will pay back in excess of £850M.............N

o wonder the country nearly went bust.
PFI Compliance.
Now have the case put before us and them. It is a well known thing that companies will over estimate their product with claims of this is the best thing since sliced bread.

How many times have we read or seen the advertisement, "NEW IMPROVED" washing powder.
[quote][p][bold]PFI Compliance[/bold] wrote: Hydrogen Peroxide is a gimmick being peddled by manufacturers of these machines which they will happily sell or rent to the NHS. Attention should be focussed at why the Private Sector cleaning contracts are not performing and keeping germs down to a reasonable level in line with the PFI output specification. The soft services sub contractor should be cleaning the inside of the hospital using the agreed specified chemicals; in line with a contractual a frequency that is regularly audited by either the PFI company (Catalyst). the NHS Trust or a 3rd party advising the Trust. This is also the case for cleaning gutters, cladding, footpaths, drains, bus shelters, glass etc. NHS Trust generally believe what they are told in monthly reports and that the PFI contractor 100% delivers the contracted services. This is all too often not the case. There are mechanisms to award service failure points, or to recover Availability payments. In the worst cases if the failure of a service (which is the responsibility of the PFI to deliver) leads to serious patient harm or death then this can be grounds for a material breach of contract which may if upheld allow termination of the PFI contract. The hospital construct cost inclusive was circa £95M but the taxpayer/NHS will pay back in excess of £850M.............N o wonder the country nearly went bust.[/p][/quote]PFI Compliance. Now have the case put before us and them. It is a well known thing that companies will over estimate their product with claims of this is the best thing since sliced bread. How many times have we read or seen the advertisement, "NEW IMPROVED" washing powder. Allan Whitehead
  • Score: 0

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